Should you Have Methadone Used for Chronic Back Pain

If you have been a sufferer of chronic back pain for any length of time you have, no doubt, heard of methadone used for chronic back pain. You may have tried many different medications in your quest for good health. When doctors prescribe medications, they have no way of knowing if they will work to help you or what reactions your body may have from the drug. It is almost like a trial and error, with the doctor trying things until they find something that works well for you.

Methadone used for chronic back pain has a good success rate when used as prescribed. It is, however, a drug that is often misunderstood and, therefore, not prescribed that often. Methadone, also referred to as Dolophine, is a narcotic pain medication used for pain ranging from medium to severe. Besides hearing about methadone used for chronic back pain, it is also used for treating a patient with morphine addiction.

Methadone used for chronic back pain may be in the form of an oral medication of used in an IV form. When it’s given as an oral dosage, some of it is stored in the liver for a later time when it is used. When given in the form of an IV, it has much the same characteristics as heroin. One positive factor when you have methadone used for chronic pain is the sufferer is often capable of going about his normal active life without having cravings such as they would have if they were taking morphine for the pain. This is a main reason why many doctors and patients prefer methadone used for chronic back pain versus morphine.

Methadone has been used as a medication for detox purposes and because of this reputation, many doctors and patients are leery when they hear of methadone used for chronic back pain, in spite of it ability to help with the pain. You have to go to either a hospital or doctor’s office to get a prescription for the dosage of methadone used for chronic back pain. It is very good for this type of pain because it’s a long acting pain reliever as opposed to the types of pain relievers that only relieve pain on a temporary basis. This is why it is recommended more for chronic back pain instead of acute back pain. It stays in the system longer than many drugs so you wouldn’t want to use it for short term pain.

Patients that experimented with methadone used for chronic back pain claimed it was very successful when they realized what dosage their body required for pain relief.

Sharp Lower Back Pain and Its Possible Origins

Sharp lower back pain can be caused by so many different conditions it is difficult to really get a fix on what the cause could be. All you really know for sure is you have sharp lower back pain and it is sudden, persistent and usually below the waist. Although this is no consolation, this is a very common occurrence for the majority of the population.

If push came to shove, the most common guess on why you are suffering from sharp lower back pain would be muscle strain as a result of heavy physical work or lifting, bending or twisting the wrong way, or sitting or standing in really weird positions (anyone ever try and paint a ceiling overhand over your head?). On their own these movements can cause sharp lower back pain, but they may also aggravate existing sharp lower back pain.
Other possibilities for sharp lower back pain can and do include spinal stenosis (when channels in the spine containing the spinal cord and nerve roots become restricted), arthritis, spinal infection, tumors, a condition called spondylolisthesis (when one of the spine’s bones slips forward over the vertebra beneath it) and fractures. Now we’re certain that since you are reading this, you are likely hoping the cause of your sharp lower back pain is NOT one of the above.
Categories of sharp lower back pain fall into either the acute or chronic areas. Acute may come on out of nowhere like a freight train and bring intense pain that usually (but not always) lasts less than three months. Chronic, as you well know, means you have it often for your lifetime, and unfortunately, chronic pain can even have episodes of acute pain.
What would you be looking for, what signs do you need to relay to your doctor? Generally speaking when listing the signs of sharp lower back pain you would be pointing to a specific area of the lower back. It would have general aching or pain that radiates into your lower back, butt and legs. You might even have numbness, tingling or weakness. Again, generally speaking, low-level signs of problems are not cause for great concern as they can usually be dealt with speedily. If however you have bowel or bladder problems because of it and severe numbness that does not subside call your doctor.
So what would your doctor be doing to figure out why you are suffering from sharp lower back pain? Besides taking a full history, he would do something called a range of motion check. You stand straight up (as best you can while in pain that is) and how you stand is evaluated, as is how you bend forward, backward and to the sides. Anything that doesn’t look right is noted.

Next your doctor will do a slow and careful palpation of the spine that may reveal muscle spasms, displacements or other sore points. By the way, your doctor will also do an abdominal palpation to check for any organ involvement. Then get ready for a series of neurological assessments, lab tests, and imaging studies to try and get to the bottom of your back problem.

Aquatic Therapy And Physical Therapy The Two That Are For You

Aquatic therapy is a form of physical therapy that centers on care that is performed in the water. This is one of the oldest forms of physical therapy and has a great number of benefits.

As far back as the Ancient Greeks, aquatic therapy, also referred to as hydrotherapy, or pool therapy, has been a trusted form of treatment for any number of ailments and problems.

The water is an effective tool in the rehabilitation of patients who may otherwise find it difficult to perform the required exercises on land. This is thanks to the reduced weight of the patient while submerged in water. For those with joint pain and other similar problems, the reduction of stress on these areas makes it easier for the physical therapy to take place. Others that would benefit from the reduction of weight include those with chronic pain, obese patients, and patients with orthopedic conditions.

Not only this, but the water’s natural resistance is an excellent tool in exercising. Strengthening muscles for those healing from fractures and for those suffering from arthritis is easier done in the water than out of the water. The physical therapy routine can be performed while in the water without the worry of placing too much strain on the affected area. This increases the proficiency of the treatment and quickens recovery time. Working with such restrictions will improve the patient’s range of motion which is an important goal of physical therapy. Rheumatologic arthritis sufferers, and those limited in their movements due to any number of conditions will enjoy the results of the aquatic therapy exercises.

Physical therapists that use water to help in the rehabilitation process understand all the benefits associated with this treatment. There are several exercises and procedures that are used by the physical therapist, along with various devices that will be implemented in the aquatic therapy. A few of these devices will look like every day pool toys. Water Noodles are used for balancing, and inner tubes for abdominal exercises or support. Other equipment such as weights and other resistance devices can aid in learning how to walk again or improving balance.

Aquatic therapy is a wonderful form of physical therapy and has many uses and benefits for the patient. Not everyone is the ideal candidate for such a procedure, but those that do qualify, like those with arthritis, can find that aquatic therapy will greatly aid in the rehabilitation process. When undertaking any physical therapy treatments, even aquatic therapy, it is important to discuss any and all potential benefits and drawbacks, not only with your primary care physician, but with the therapist as well.

Back Pain Relief….Give Me a Break!

Going on a hunt for back pain relief becomes a critical mission for someone looking for a break from the pain. A lot of back pain issues can actually be handled at home with easy treatments you can learn to do yourself. For example, simple muscle sprains normally don’t need a doctor and can be handled with some bed rest. Even if you have bouts of pain that come and go, or chronic pain, you want to know all the techniques that might at least give you some temporary relief.

Back pain should never be minimized. Any pain that affects your sleep and your daily activities needs to be addressed. There are some symptoms or causes that indicate you should see a doctor right away for back pain relief. These include injuries, weak legs, and unbearable pain that never subsides. But most pain lasts less than a month and doesn’t keep you from living a normal life. For that kind of pain, you just need forms of relief while the muscle or sprain heals.

Back pain relief can often be found by following some very simple guidelines. For example, when you are having a “back attack”, getting any sleep or rest may be difficult. Lack of sleep increases the stress of the situation and adds to the pain. The best way to sleep when you’re having back pain is on your side with your knees bent at a 90 degree angle. This is the position that puts the least amount of stress on the spinal discs. You can also sleep on your back with a pillow under your knees.

Anti-inflammatory medicines can often provide back pain relief also. There are several over-the-counter medications that can reduce muscle swelling and thus reduce pain. Many people use ice packs or heating pads in conjunction with the anti-inflammatory drugs to find relief.

Exercise can also provide back pain relief. Unfortunately, when people have back pain they tend to think they shouldn’t do any exercise. Yet strengthening the back muscles is often the cure when the pain is due to injuries resulting from weak muscles. It can also reduce pain in backs with vertebrae problems by creating a strong muscular support system.

Of course, if you can’t find back pain relief using these simple ideas, and the pain continues or gets worse, a doctor should be consulted. There are many options the doctor can offer to provide a break from the pain. They include physical therapy exercise programs and massage, electrical stimulation, prescription medications, nerve blocks and surgery. There is a wide range of choices for back pain relief therapy, and the doctor will review the ones that will work best in your situation.

Chronic Back Pain…No End in Sight

Chronic back pain is pain that generally lasts longer than 3 months. Like any long lasting pain, it can interfere with normal daily functioning and create emotional and psychological, as well as, physical problems. There can be a fine line distinction between recurring and chronic pain, when the incidences of pain come close together over a long period of time. No matter how the pain is defined, it’s important to deal with all of the contributors to chronic back pain.

Medical science has slowly been coming to the conclusion that controlling pain for some people is as much as about controlling the pain center responses in the brain as it is to fixing the physical cause of the pain. In other words, you may have a physical reason for the chronic back pain, but the pain can be much worse due to psychological factors such as stress or worry. You can also increase your back pain by reducing your physical activity in response to the pain, resulting in an increasing deteriorating physical condition.

There are many approaches that can be taken to deal with chronic back pain. A doctor can prescribe medicine that blocks the pain response in the brain. Surgery is sometimes suggested, though it’s seldom the first choice. Often, the best way to deal with back pain is by increasing physical activity on a planned schedule.

All too often, people with back pain quit doing certain activities because of the pain. As a result, the muscles in the back weaken and are not exercised regularly. This can create even more pain as the spinal column fails to get adequate muscular support. Many people believe the only way to deal with chronic back pain is to take medicine, but that should be only one option you consider. Chronic back pain can often be temporarily lessoned with simple measure like ice or hot packs and massage. But when these fail, there are other alternatives.

* Trigger point injections of an anesthetic into the muscle area causing the most pain

* Minor surgery to implant electrodes along the spine to block pain signals from the brain (called spinal column stimulation)

* Spinal epidural which deadens the area on the spine where the pain is emanating

* Major surgery which such as a spinal fusion

Most of time some form of medication will be tried before deciding to have surgery. Surgery is the last resort, because it’s the most invasive. Also, since the source of a lot of back pain can’t be pinpointed, surgery becomes more exploratory than curing. Medications used to deal with chronic back pain include painkillers, anti-inflammatory medication, muscle relaxants and sedatives or anti-depressants. Since the feeling of pain starts in the brain, some drugs intended to calm a person mentally can sometimes result in less pain due to the changes they bring to brain chemicals.

As you can see, there are many alternatives to deal with chronic back pain. They range from temporary relief enabling you to handle a bout of long term recurring pain to invasive solutions.